Thursday, March 8, 2012

Drip Irrigation Experiment 3

The second drip irrigation barrel was easier and less expensive to make.

I drilled a 7/8” hole near the bottom and forced an old ¾” hose bib in. It took a lot of force to start turning that hose bib, but once it was in, no leaks, and no need for a washer or even a nut or fitting to hold it in place. The same went for the 2” PVC fitting used as a fill spout. Cutting the hole just slightly too small made for a tight fit and no fitting on the inside to hold it in place.

This bed is not as wide as the other, so I used two emitter pipes rather than four. I drilled 1/16” holes approximately 12” apart. It takes about six hours to empty the 50 gallon barrel, which means, I hope, my irrigator will water our garden plants for six long hot hours each day this summer.

I used a product called “Liquid Tape” to seal the 1/8 inch holes on my first effort, and re-drilled on the other side of the pipe with the 1/16” bit.







6 comments:

  1. How has this system worked and has it been used every year?

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    Replies
    1. It worked for a couple seasons. We moved the garden, began focusing on mulch, and eventually abandoned the beds and barrels.

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  2. How do these barrels get filled with rainwater? I don't see any structure or guttering filling them.

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    Replies
    1. Hey, Rick. They weren't designed as a rainwater system. They were simply a way to more efficiently water the garden plants.

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    2. If it didn't work well enough to continue it, why not take down this pic? It would save other newbies the expense of making it.

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  3. These are simply raised beds with a little irrigation system. They worked like raised beds work. We planted in them a couple seasons. Make yours any way you like and use them as long as you please. Take pictures and post them on your blog.

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